Summertime Fish Stockings

Many people think that we raise fish at our home office but the truth is we try to hold onto fish for the least amount of time as possible. Holding high densities of fish is a risky business. No only is oxygen a concern but high levels of nutrients result from eating feed. Ammonia and phosphorus levels can build up. These nutrients can fuel algae blooms. Algae blooms create lots of oxygen during the day but absorb oxygen at night. This can be a dicey situation. Along with oxygen issues there are predatory birds and otters.

This blog is a quick snapshot of us working some channel catfish up from our ponds.

We lure the catfish into our seine with feed. We turn the feeders off a day before harvest to make them feisty that morning.
A good pull requires patience and a little common sense.
Moving the fish from the seine to tanks is very important. This is where fish are likely to get roughed up. When fish are roughed up they develop sores. Sores are an invitation for infection.
These channel catfish were much larger than we usually have. He seined sixty catfish that weighed sixty-eight pounds for our client. The client has a smaller pond so these will be perfect.
Tyler holding one that ran a little above average. This particular client wanted larger catfish.
On a side note: Once catfish get this large they will compete with largemouth bass for forage. Keep in mind that if you want big bass it’s best to not stock catfish.

After an early morning the fish were delivered and stocked healthy. Keep up with our Facebook and Instagram page for updates on unique fish stocking opportunities.